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British 'spy' accused of receiving USB stick with 'state secrets,' lawyer saysInvestigators have accused a British citizen held on espionage charges in Russia of receiving a USB stick that contained state secrets, his lawyer has said.  Paul Whelan, 48, believed the USB stick had photographs and other information about a church he had visited, lawyer Vladimir Zherebenkov said. FSB security agents swooped in and seized him before he could see what was on the flash drive, he added. Russian media previously claimed he was grabbed at the Metropole Hotel near the Kremlin while receiving a USB stick with a list of employees of a state agency. In the first public appearance since he was detained on December 28, Moscow city court refused an appeal to grant bail to Mr Whelan, leaving him pre-trial confinement in Lefortovo jail until at least the end of February. He faces 10 to 20 years in prison. Mr Whelan, head of security for a Michigan auto parts company who holds American, British, Canadian and Irish passports, appeared calm and well-fed. Dressed in a blue shirt, dark trousers and rimless eyeglasses, the former Marine and police officer declined to answer shouted questions, instead whispering with his lawyers through an opening in the thick glass defendant's cage.  A source told The Telegraph last week that Mr Whelan is accused of gathering information about “classified military structures”. During the hearing, which was closed until the judge returned with a decision, Mr Whelan “refuted in detail the prosecution's arguments,” Mr Zherebenkov said.  “He didn't think these were state secrets, as he did indeed say, 'I'm a friend of Russia,'” the lawyer said. “He has a lot of acquaintances here. For him all these meetings, all these contacts were ordinary and connected with the culture of the country, nothing more.” The defence had offered a bond of up to 30 million roubles (£350,000) for his release. Lawyer Vladimir Zherebenkov speaks to Mr Whelan in the defendant's cage Credit: Maxim Shemetov/Reuters Russian police have often been accused of faking evidence, and in September, two officers in Izhevsk were given prison sentences for planting a pistol and personal items from a supposed victim on an innocent man. Mr Whelan was detained by the powerful FSB, however, in a much more high-profile bust. Former CIA officers have said the United States wouldn't send an agent to Russia without diplomatic cover. Although Mr Whelan “feels good,” he has an illness that requires medical attention, and Mr Zherebenkov said he had agreed with investigators to have a doctor visit him with an interpreter, as he doesn't speak good Russian. He is reportedly suffering from a hernia as well as a shoulder problem.  Prison monitors have said his cell is better than normal, with good heating, a television and a refrigerator. Vladimir Putin's spokesman denied that Mr Whelan had been detained as a “pawn in a diplomatic game,” but some including US officials have disputed this. There has been speculation Moscow could seek to swap him for a Russian prisoner in the United States. Mr Whelan's twin brother previously told The Telegraph that the family had doubts about the appointment of Mr Zherebenkov to represent him. While the lawyer has successfully defended well-known clients like former Ukrainian prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko, he is known to have close relationships with state investigators after working as one himself for two decades.  Mr Zherebenkov speaks outside Moscow city court on Tuesday Credit: Maxim Shemetov/Reuters Mr Whelan came to Russia in December for a friend's wedding and showed other guests around the Kremlin grounds, relatives have said. Friends contacted the embassy when he failed to appear at the wedding. At least 20 friends on his page on a Russian social network had completed military education or service, while others worked in IT. His twin brother previously told The Telegraph that Mr Whelan had always enjoyed meeting foreign military and law enforcement personnel during his extensive travels.  Mr Whelan first visited Russia while on leave after serving in Iraq in 2007, a trip he described afterward as a chance to “travel throughout the world wherever we want to go and experience the diversity of culture”. He came to Russia on several other occasions and, according to his lawyer, had in May visited Sergiyev Posad, a city near Moscow famous for its ancient monastery complex. He has also reportedly been to the imperial capital of St Petersburg as well as Volgograd, which is known for its Second World War history.  Mr Whelan joined the US Marine Corps reserves in 1994 but was court-martialled over larceny allegations and discharged for bad conduct in 2008.  He was employed at the temporary staffing firm Kelly Services, which operates in countries including Russia, as senior manager of global security and investigations. Most recently he was employed at auto parts supplier BorgWarner, which has said he wasn't in Russia for work.  He also did stints in law enforcement and at one point started an online gun-selling business.


1/22/2019 12:07:09 PM

Three dead from separate avalanches in Colorado and New MexicoTwo deaths have been confirmed in the US after two separate avalanches in Colorado and New Mexico trapped skiers in crushing snow this week and last. Authorities in Aspen, Colorado confirmed the most recent death on Monday, which happened to be the same day that relatives of a New Mexico avalanche victim announced their loss. A second victim of the New Mexico avalanche had already been reported.


1/22/2019 2:22:39 PM

See Niagara Falls Transform Into an Icy Wonderland Amid Bone-Chilling ColdImages show trees and pathways coated in thick sheets of snow and ice


1/22/2019 10:33:53 AM

WaPo Issues Correction after Falsely Labeling Nathan Phillips a Vietnam VetThe Washington Post issued a correction Tuesday after falsely describing the elderly Native American man whose confrontation with a group of high-school students went viral over the weekend as a veteran of the Vietnam War. “Earlier versions of this story incorrectly said that Native American activist Nathan Phillips fought in the Vietnam War.


1/22/2019 3:31:48 PM

House Democrats turbocharge committee probes of TrumpThe little-noticed change, made since the Democrats took over majority control of the House earlier this month, will let staffers of House investigative committees take testimony from subpoenaed witnesses without a lawmaker being present. By eliminating complications with lawmakers' schedules, the change will let staffers work faster and range more widely, said former staffers and sources inside the committees that are launching several inquiries into Trump and his presidency. The importance of this was underscored, legal experts said, when attorney general nominee William Barr indicated last week that he was unlikely to release the final report from Special Counsel Robert Mueller to lawmakers in its original format.


1/22/2019 5:05:30 AM

Striking teachers in LA reach tentative settlement with districtLos Angeles public school teachers reached a tentative settlement with school officials Tuesday in order to end a weeklong strike that has affected some 500,000 students. The settlement -- reached after 21 hours of marathon talks that ended early Tuesday -- was set to be voted on by the roughly 30,000 members of the teachers union later in the day and classes are due to resume on Wednesday. "The strike nobody wanted is now behind us," Los Angeles United School District superintendent Austin Beutner said at a joint press conference with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Alex Caputo-Pearl, the president of United Teachers Los Angeles.


1/22/2019 4:32:07 PM

Police searching for Round Lake man after girl, 11, drives to schoolPolice in far north suburban Round Lake are searching for a man after teachers at John J. Murphy Elementary School saw an 11-year-old girl pull up to the school with the adult man in the passenger seat.


1/21/2019 7:40:57 PM

The Moon was hit by a meteorite while you were staring at the ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ eclipseSkywatchers had plenty to be excited about this past weekend thanks to a lunar eclipse that was visible from the Americas as well as parts of Europe, Africa, and Asia. It got the nickname "Super Blood Wolf Moon" thanks to a combination of labels that may or may not have much meaning, but it was an undeniably cool sight nonetheless. As it turns out, the eclipse was even more special than most observers had noticed, as the Moon was actually struck by a meteorite while everyone was gazing in wonder at its rusty appearance. A new video from astronomer Jose Madiedo, using imagery gathered by the MIDAS impact survey effort, shows the exact moment of impact. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNvfBCu-jjI In the video you can clearly see a tiny dot flash in the upper left corner of the Moon sphere, appearing for only a fraction of a second before being shrouded in darkness. Some observers who were watching live coverage of the eclipse spotted the brief flash, debating what might have caused it. The MIDAS survey is a Moon-watching that scours video of its surface in the hopes of detecting the tiny flashes associated with meteorite impacts. In this case, MIDAS scored a home run, and it was the first time the system was able to spot an impact during a total lunar eclipse. "In total I spent almost two days without sleeping, including the monitoring time during the eclipse," Madiedo explained to Gizmodo. "I was exhausted when the eclipse ended--but when the automatic detection software notified me of a bright flash, I jumped out of my chair. It was a very exciting moment because I knew such a thing had never been recorded before." The meteorite itself wasn't terribly large, and is estimated to have only been around 22 pounds. Still, its impact was large enough to be spotted by observers as well as the automated MIDAS system, and that's pretty cool.


1/22/2019 12:01:56 PM

Ocasio-Cortez, other progressives land spots on powerful committee poised to investigate TrumpReps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib were among the outspoken progressive appointments to the influential Oversight and Reform committee, which is poised to investigate Trump under new Democrat leadership.


1/23/2019 7:11:22 AM

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